Thursday, March 2, 2017

Weekly Announcements 3/2

Dear Environmental Studies Students,

Please find this week’s Environmental Studies Announcements below.

On Campus Events
1.       Volunteers needed as Composting Begins in McElroy
2.       Making Human Rights the Compass for all Ethical Globalization with Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland
3.       The Road from the Paris Climate Agreement
4.       Conscience: The Challenge of Pope Francis by Simone Campbell, S.S.S.
5.       Ecological-Cultural Struggles of Indigenous Peoples: Toward a Sustainable Economy” with Agnes Brazal
6.       Climate Change as a Consequence of Human Presence: A Dialogue between Anthropology and Biblical Studies

Off Campus Events
1.       New Directions in Environmental Law

Research and Study Abroad Opportunities
1.          Fish Monitoring Research Assistant
2.          Summer Field School in Ethnographic Methods in NYC
3.          Study Abroad with the Green Program
4.          Undergraduate Environmental and Ecological Research Opportunities in Montana
5.          Summer Program on Integral Ecology in the Peruvian Upper Amazon
6.          Courses in Belize
7.          Prehistorical Archeology

Internship, Graduate School, Training, and Job Opportunities
1.        Advocacy Directory Neponset River Watershed Association
2.        Climate and Environmental Physics Program – University of Bern
3.        Work with Impact
4.        EnergyBar: Clean Tech Intern Fair
5.        US Fish and Wildlife Services: Directorate Resource Assistant Fellows Program
6.        Isabella Welles Hunnewell Internship at the Arnold Arboretum
7.        Intern with the Environmental Voter Project
8.        Paid Summer Teaching Opportunity
9.        Earth Leadership Cohort
10.      Part-Time Writer and Researcher with Energy Sage
11.      Environmental League of Massachusetts, Communications/Development Intern
12.      Environmental Voter Project Internships
13.      Job Opportunities with Mass and US PIRG
14.      Internship with Environment America
15.      BC Career Center Updates

Best,
Kevin

--
B. Kevin Brown
Graduate Assistant, Environmental Studies
617-552-2477
Devlin 213






Compost Initiative at McElroy
A Joint Project through BC Dining, the Office of Sustainability, UGBC & Environmental Caucus


Beginning Monday, March 13th
McElroy Dining Hall

Goals and Mission:
        To successfully implement a post-consumer, student-run composting system in McElroy during peak dinner hours;
        To facilitate a discussion with students about composting and recycling in campus dining halls to better understand how these programs can be improved;
        To promote knowledge and understanding of the sustainability impacts of composting and recycling among members of the BC community and encourage students to make positive, environmentally-friendly decisions in regards to waste management.

“Compost Guide” Volunteer Jobs and Responsibilities
       Monitor waste bins (recycling, compost and trash) and ensure that students are placing waste in the correct bins, with special attention to the new bins and countertops;
       Explain the purpose of the trial run and how UGBC, BC Dining, the Office of Sustainability, and the Environmental Caucus collaborated on this event;
       Encourage dialogue with students about the benefits of composting, including the environmental implications of diverting food waste from trash;
       Answer any questions students may have about what can be composted / recycled and why, what BCDS already does in terms of composting, how and from whom the waste is collected / transported, or anything else related to sustainability (see FAQ section for background or contact gourlay@bc.edu with specific questions).   

FAQs
What can be composted on campus?
All food waste, including fruit and vegetables, meat, poultry, bones and fat trimmings, dairy products, egg shells, and other organic wastes such as coffee grounds, paper napkins, and tea bags can be composted.

Which BC Dining halls collect compost?
All BC Dining facilities collect and compost pre-consumer waste. This includes any excess food waste generated prior to being served to students. Pre-consumer food waste is the easiest to compost because it is already separated from the rest of the waste stream and can be sorted directly in the kitchen. It is more challenging to collect post-consumer waste, or the food left after consumption, because it is more likely to be contaminated with non-compostable scraps. At Boston College, only Corcoran Commons has the infrastructure to compost post-consumer waste. This waste is collected and sorted in the back by BC Dining employees.
Who takes care of composting on campus?
Boston College proudly works with Save That Stuff to collect recyclables, compost and other trash materials from our campus. Check out the Save That Stuff  website for more information about composting, recycling, and other ways to divert food waste.
What are the benefits of composting?
Composting is an effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by diverting organic waste from landfills and reducing methane emissions. Food that is mixed in with regular trash is estimated to make up about 40% of the trash in landfills. It also is the biggest offender in creating landfill methane which is a powerful greenhouse gas – 72 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. Reducing landfill methane is just one of the benefits of keeping this type of waste out of landfills.
Composting also has “upstream” benefits when it is re-integrated into ecosystems as organic matter to improve the health and workability of soils. Compost is full of beneficial nutrients, which can stimulate plant growth and retain water and moisture in soils.
What is the history of composting at McElroy?
In the past, student-based initiatives collaborating with BC Dining and the Office of Sustainability have organized and implemented composting programs at McElroy. Unlike other dining halls, like Corcoran, McElroy does not have the infrastructure to sort post-consumer waste in the back by BC Dining employees. This means that students must successfully sort waste themselves to ensure that the compost and recycling is not contaminated. This requires an understanding of what can and cannot be composted, what can be recycled, and what bins are designated for each. Without proper signage and/or an understanding of waste diversion, the bins get contaminated with trash / non-compostable or recyclable items. Due to the frequency of these events, and the economic burden this mismanagement places on the University, composting programs have never remained in practice for the long-term.
After a week-long trial run before winter break, the team collected student feedback about current composting initiatives and how we can approve them. In the weeks following, we created a comprehensive publicity and outreach campaign to introduce the idea to students and ensure that come spring break, students would be aware that composting would be introduced at McElroy.






Clough Colloquium

 

Making Human Rights the Compass for All Ethical Globalization

 



Mary Robinson
Former President of Ireland
Mary Robinson, president of the Mary Robinson Foundation-Climate Justice served as the first female president of Ireland from 1990-1997 and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights from 1997-2002. She is a member of the Elders, the Club of Madrid, and is the recipient of numerous honors and awards including the United States Presidential Medal of Freedom. She sits on the advisory board of Sustainable Energy For All (SE4All) and is also a member of the Lead Group of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement.
Monday, March 13, 2017
Heights Room (Corcoran Commons) • 4:00 PM

http://bc.edu/content/dam/files/schools/csom/research/leadership/3dots.png
CELEBRATING WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH

Presented with the BC Women's Collaborative, Women's Center, and the Civic Engagement Committee.

Doors open at 3:30 pm and seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.









Presenter: Simone Campbell, S.S.S., Executive Director of NETWORK
Location & Time: St. Ignatius, Upper Church, 7:00 p.m.
Sponsors: Campus Ministry and The C21 Center




March 27, 5 p.m.
Gasson 305
Professor Agnes Brazal (De la Salle University, Manila) will present this year's Duffy Lectures in Global Christianity. The theme of her lecture series is "Liberation-Postcolonial Ethics in the Philippines." The theme of this lecture is "Ecological-Cultural Struggles of Indigenous Peoples: Toward a Sustainable Economy.

Agnes M. Brazal is associate professor of theology at the De la Salle University Manila, Philippines. She was also past President and founding member of the DaKaTeo (Catholic Theological Society of the Philippines) and one of the first coordinators and "mothers" of the Ecclesia of Women in Asia (association of Catholic women theologians in Asia).











ANNUAL LECTURE IN HONOR OF RICHARD J. CLIFFORD, S.J.

Thursday, April 6, 2017, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Presenter:  Carol A. Newsom
Corcoran Commons, Heights Room, Chestnut Hill Campus
Free of Charge
Maps and directions
Parking

Human induced climate change is the most serious problem confronting the ecology of our planet.  Was this an inevitable consequence of the appearance of humans in the ecosystem?  How should we think about how we got to this terrifying state, and how can we think hopefully about the future?  Anthropologists who study the emergence of homo sapiens present an account of our origins that engages in intriguing ways with the Israelite reflections on human origins in Genesis 1-11.  Here is a conversation between religion and science that offers true insight into how our unique nature is both a danger and a promise in this fragile world.
Sponsored by the School of Theology and Ministry,
and generously supported by the Kitz Family in honor of Richard J. Clifford, S.J.
Carol A. Newsom is the C. H. Candler Professor of Old Testament/Hebrew Bible at the Candler School of Theology, Emory University. 


Job Opening – Fish Monitoring Research Assistant - Temporary, Wells Maine

The Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve in Maine is seeking qualified applicants for a full-time (40 hours per week) seasonal Research Assistant position. The position will last for ten weeks from March 20, 2017 to May 26, 2017.

The position will support ongoing monitoring of diadromous fish species in the York River. Work will primarily include field data collection through the use of trapping, netting, and visual surveys. The Research Assistant will work with Reserve staff and volunteers to deploy and maintain equipment, collect samples, manage data, and conduct lab analyses. The monitoring work will occur four weekdays/week with the 5th day for equipment maintenance and data management. They will also assist with dissemination of project outcomes through written reports and public outreach.

Qualified applicants will possess a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology, Ecology, Environmental Science, or a related field. Experience with collecting data in the field and following written protocols is highly desired. Applicants should also be able to work collaboratively as a member of a team and work well independently, and should be organized and detail oriented. Work will be physical with the carrying and deploying of nets and traps with weights up to 60 pounds over uneven ground and soft river bed. Field conditions are likely to be cold and inclement at times. Applicants must hold a valid driver’s license with a clean driving record.

The Research Assistant will be compensated at $13.65 per hour and will be eligible to receive free onsite housing. 

Interested applicants should send a cover letter, resume of work experience, three professional or academic references, and a copy of their college transcript by email to tsmith@wellsnerr.org
or by mail to:

attn: Tin Smith
Wells Reserve
342 Laudhom Farm Road
Wells, Maine 04090

Applications will be reviewed starting February 23 and will close March 7th, 2017


Summer Field School in Ethnographic Methods in New York City
10th CIFAS Field School in Ethnographic Research Methods, June 12 to 22, 2017


The Comitas Institute for Anthropological Study (CIFAS) is pleased to announce the 10th CIFAS Field School in Ethnographic Research Methods, in New York City.

The goal of the Field School is to offer training in the foundations and practice of ethnographic methods. The faculty works closely with participants to identify the required field methods needed to address their academic or professional needs. The Field School is suitable for graduate and undergraduate students in social sciences and other fields of study that use qualitative approaches (such as education, communication, cultural studies, health, social work, human ecology, development studies, consumer behavior, among others), applied social scientists, professionals, and researchers who have an interest in learning more about ethnographic methods and their applications.

The total work load of the course is 30 hours. Students interested in earning credits for the course may have additional assignments in order to totalize 45 hours of activities (what is equivalent to 3 credits).

Course venue: Classes will take place at the Institute for Latin American Studies at Columbia University.

Coordinators:

Renzo Taddei (Assistant Professor, Federal University of São Paulo/Affiliated Researcher, Columbia University).

Lambros Comitas (Gardner Cowles Professor of Anthropology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University).

Registration and other costs: Places are limited. The tuition fee is US$ 900. The tuition fee does not cover accommodation, meals or transportation.

For more information or to register, see link attached, or please write to Renzo Taddei at rrt20@columbia.edu





Created for students, by students, The GREEN Program has introduced a new model for education abroad. Our accredited, short-term model focuses on bringing transformative experiences to students around the world and unlocking doors to governmental, public, and private facility access, exclusive tours, and unique bucket-list experiences around the world. We are working with universities around the world to redefine what a classroom should mean - from lecture halls to studying the effects of climate change on the top of our world's glaciers.
As commitment partners to the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals, The GREEN Program exposes students to the heart and guts of these sustainability challenges and initiatives around the world.
Our programs are catered to students who are curious about the world and seek opportunities to adventure, break outside of their comfort zones, and stand out amongst their peers as global citizens.
 

We don’t want students to choose between a job, internship, or a study abroad experience. We want them to do it all.
 

We help students maximize their winter, spring, and summer breaks in order to allow them to get in a fulfilling educational abroad experience within just 8-10 days. All the while, students are able to land that awesome internship they’ve had their eye on, complete summer classes needed to graduate on time, or challenge their idea towards global citizenship.

Currently on our 7th year, we currently operate over the spread of three continents. Our organization’s core team and company headquarters are located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Our full-time team of five works out of Pipeline Philly, a co-working space located in Center City, Philadelphia. As one of the founding members of the space, The GREEN Program is a part of this ever-growing community now home to more than 200 companies and organizations.

Beyond Philadelphia, we work alongside numerous indigenous educational institutions and organizations specific to our program locations. Fearless adventure leaders and passionate education gurus, our in-country guides are an integral part of what makes GREEN, GREEN. Of course, our community would not be what it is today without our extended GREEN Family – The GREEN Program Alumni. Having hosted participants from more than 300 universities around the world, we are elated to welcome more than 1800 student leaders and young professionals into our ever-growing community.

Our team and students all have one underlying mission in common: we have consciously chosen to pursue a future of possibilities, and are determined to be part of the solutions toward a better world.

Visit http://thegreenprogram.com/programs to learn about our programs.


Swan Valley Connections is an integrated education and conservation non-profit in Western Montana. We offer students the opportunity to study the complexities of natural resource management through experiential learning. We specialize in interdisciplinary, place-based education, as we believe that a deep understanding of natural history and ecological processes combined with empathy for human communities leads to innovative and thoughtful stewardship.

Our programs, Landscape and Livelihood and Wildlife in the West, are unique because we provide high-quality education (we are accredited by the University of Montana) and we are actively engaged in collaborative monitoring projects and community-based conservation. This allows us to expose students to conservation professionals as they are grappling with natural resource issues in real time. We also invite alumni of our programs to come back as interns as part of our mission to foster the next generation of conservation leaders.  



Summer Program

July 1 – August 11, 2017

August 12-26, 2017 – optional forest retreat with focus on Amazonian medicinal plants

Sachamama Center for Biocultural Regeneration (SCBR)
Lamas, Department of San Martin, Peru

Levels: Undergraduate students, MA students, and Activists

Course Faculty: Dr. Frederique Apffel-Marglin, Professor Emerita, Dept. of Anthropology at Smith College, fmarglin@smith.edu

Application deadline: March 31, 2017

Testimonial by Aleena Glinski, Yale student: "This is a remarkable program where students experientially learn about the agroforestry techniques of the indigenous people of the high amazon in Lamas, Peru. One learns how to make terra preta and biochar in seminars and in the field while exploring the cosmovisions of the indigenous people who originally created this miraculous soil both in text and in conversations with Kechwa people. Throughout, there is an emphasis on deeply investigating the origins of the nature-culture dichotomy in a cross-disciplinary manner, which inevitably results in personal discovery into our connection to and role within the biosphere."  

See the flyer:
http://fore.yale.edu/files/2017_Integral_Ecology_Program.pdf



The Center for Engaged Learning Abroad delivers two week field courses in environmental science and conservation using the country of Belize as a classroom, during May and June, and over the winter break.  This Caribbean/Central American country provides a rich learning context and is a great place for students studying abroad for the first time.  Please share this email with students or faculty who may have an interest in engaged learning abroad in English-speaking Belize.

Thank you,
Ed Boles, Ph.D.
Faculty Associate

The field courses, briefly described below, give students powerful field methods experiences, exposes them to areas of science they may want to pursue further and they gain a lot of confidence in capabilities.   These courses carry three hours of credit, transferable back to home institutions with prior academic approval.
Wildlife Health, Ecology and Conservation:  This course, taught by a wildlife veterinarian, introduces students to tropical ecology, local conservation efforts, Belizean wildlife and wildlife research techniques, and zoo and wildlife health issues and medicine.   Students explore the many factors that effect the management, conservation, habitat and health of wild animals; work alongside zookeepers in the world renowned Belize Zoo; participate in surgeries, animal enrichment and health management at the Zoo; and explore rehabilitation and conservation at a variety of wildlife organizations in Belize.
Watershed Conservation, Ecology and Management: This course explores the general structure and ecology of watersheds, the movement of surface and sub-surface waters through the landscape, larger integrated interactions of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, overall ecological services provided by watersheds, impact on human activities on watershed structure and function, assessment and monitoring of watersheds, and solutions to human induced impacts while providing students with hands-on experience in field research techniques.
Tropical Marine Ecology and Conservation:  This systems-ecology course includes classroom, field and laboratory components in terrestrial riparian, estuarine and marine ecosystems with emphasis on watershed interconnectivity and reef/mangrove/seagrass ecology and conservation.  The Caribbean Sea is explored from Tobacco Caye, a five acre island of sand perched on the reef with mangroves and grassbeds, with mask and snorkel, both day and night.
Health, Belief and Ethnobotany in Belize: This course explores traditional healing, spiritual belief, sustainability, food security and agro-forestry.  Through lectures, discussions, visits to healers/elders, and tours to farms and medicinal plant gardens, students will have the opportunity to experience unique and unforgettable traditions as they have been passed down through generations.  This is a field oriented course with rustic accommodations and local cuisine.   Students will go on jungle hikes in hot and humid conditions with some rain.  Cultural sensitivity, adventurous personality, stamina, desire to learn from other cultures and an open mind are desirable traits for students to succeed in this course.




These are exciting times to engage with prehistoric archaeology. New finds shed light on the origin of our own species, and novel research is providing fresh insights into the relationships with our closest relatives, the Neanderthals. Innovative work is allowing us to gain better understanding of the origins of agriculture and the shift to sedentary life.

Many of the IFR field schools directly engage with these topics. Our Lesotho-Sehonghong Rockshelter program explores the evolution of hunting & gathering technology over tens of thousands of years in one of Southern Africa most impressive and historically significant rock shelters. The South Africa- Spitzkloof field school investigates human/biota relationships in the past 60,000 years in the rugged and remote areas of the Richtersveld region of Namaqualand, a coastal desert in the northwest corner of the country. Work at the Montenegro-Vrbička Cave focuses on human evolution from the Late Paleolithic through the Mesolithic and to the Early Neolithic in the Balkans. Surprisingly, the site shows evidence of human occupation during the Upper Paleolithic, one of the coldest phases of the last Ice Age (the Last Glacial Maximum, around 22,000 years ago).
At the recent AIA annual conference, Michael Richards (Simon Fraser University) suggested that while Neanderthals were efficient top predators, they focused on terrestrial animals exclusively. The newly arrived Anatomically Modern Humans (AMH), on the other hand, added fish and other marine animals to their diet – a possible relative advantage that allowed AMH to push out Neanderthals from all available environmental niches. Is this the case?

Our Portugal-Vale Boi field school team addresses such questions as it studies the Upper Paleolithic and possible interaction between AMH and Neanderthals in the region. Preservation at Vale Boi is of remarkable quality with impressive faunal recovery and numerous lithic assemblages present. Vale Boi project members are examining adaptive strategies of both species. Our program at Spain-Cova Gran explores early human arrival to the Iberian Peninsula and AMH-Neanderthal interactions. The site covers more than 50,000 years of human occupation with upper layers dating to the early Neolithic period and the arrival of early farmers to the south Pyrenees.
Finally, IFR’s later prehistory offerings feature the shift from hunting and gathering to agriculture. Our Turkey-Boncuklu  field school is focused on the transition from nomadic to sedentary lifestyle in Anatolia. Boncuklu is the earliest village in central Anatolia and the predecessor of the famous Neolithic site of C
̧atalhöyük. It is an ideal location to study this critical transformation to permanent human settlements, including its advantages and pitfalls. Finally, research at our Bulgaria-Tel Yunatsite and Bulgaria-Ilindentsi field schools is focused on the entry of early farmers from Anatolia to Europe and debates about agriculture’s arrival by technology diffusion or population movement.

Will you please let interested students know about these opportunities? Per usual, I would like to remind you of our extensive scholarship offerings. Students are strongly encouraged to apply to any of our scholarships for which they may be eligible.

Sincerely,

Ran Boytner


The Neponset River Watershed Association is looking to hire a part-time Advocacy Director to help us cleanup and protect the watershed through legislative, administrative and permitting advocacy, technical assistance, and partnership building. Our Advocacy Director will be working with municipalities on stormwater and streamflow, and representing us on a variety of policy and permitting questions at the federal, state and local levels.  Full job description can be found at: https://www.neponset.org/about/employment.



The University of Bern is participating in the MIT European Career Fair for the first time, featuring its climate and environmental physics program, one of the strongest programs in Europe in this field. For the occasion Professor Christoph Raible, an expert in processes of the climate systems, atmosphere-ocean-sea ice interaction, climate modelling, atmospheric dynamics, past and future climate change, predictability, tropical and extra tropical cyclones, and climate impacts, will be in Boston at the following events:

·         Evening of Friday 24th, Swiss Sciences Night at MIT (https://swisssciencesnight.eventbrite.com)
·         All day Saturday 25th, MIT European Career Fair (https://ecf.fairsey.com/)

We would be most grateful if you could share this with any students who might be interested. Because the Swiss Sciences Night is almost at capacity we ask that interested students get in touch with me at: francesco@swissnexboston.org. The MIT European Career Fair will run on Saturday from 9am to 4pm and does not require advance registration. Walk-ins are welcome all day.



Make Your Impact for Our Environment,
Our Democracy and Our Future

Apply to Impact today!
Final spring application deadline is March 10th


If you are interested in joining a team of passionate people to make an impact on issues like global warming, clean water, big money’s influence over our democracy and other issues that matter to our future, consider a job with Impact.

Impact was created by leading advocacy organizations like Environment America, U.S. PIRG and the PIRG Campus Action project. We build the grassroots action and power it takes to make an impact on important issues. It’s a full-time, two-year commitment to advocate for our environment, our democracy and our future.

Impact is now accepting applications to join our team in August 2017! Our application deadline is March 10th. We also have immediate positions available.

If you aren’t looking for a full-time job, you can also make a big difference through an internship with Impact.

You can learn more and apply on our website or reach out to our Director, David Rossini, at jobs@weareimpact.org.

Impact is an equal opportunity employer and will not discriminate against any employee or applicant on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, religion, age, sex, disability, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity or veteran status.



The Greentown Labs Cleantech Intern Fair 

Join us for a special edition of our bi-monthly EnergyBar! event for an Intern Fair on Thursday, March 2 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. before an evening of networking
Are you a student interested in cleantech and energy? Do you need a summer internship? If yes, then look no further!

The Greentown Labs Cleantech Intern Fair is your perfect resource for connecting with innovative startups working to solve the world's biggest energy and environmental challenges. A summer internship should be so much more than making copies and getting coffee, you should feel committed and proud of the impact you make on the company you spend your summer with.

Students of all majors are encouraged to attend but those with a business or engineering focus are highly sought after!

Event Agenda:
  • 4:30-6:30pm -- Sign-in / Intern Fair 
  • 6:30-7:00pm -- Welcoming Remarks from Greentown Labs and The Boston Foundation 
  • 7:00-8:30pm -- Networking & Celebrating the Cleantech Ecosystem! 

Greentown Labs is located at 28 Dane St., Somerville, MA 02143. There is limited parking available and we encourage attendees to consider public transportation. Light appetizers and drinks will be served starting at 5:30 p.m. Suggested dress is shop floor casual. 


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), in partnership with the Student Conservation Association (SCA), is offering a summer 2017 fellowship opportunity at the Gulf of Maine Coastal Program Office.  I would appreciate any assistance you could provide in finding a candidate for this position by distributing this information within your networks. 

The Directorate Resource Assistant Fellows Program (DFP) is an 11-week summer fellowship program designed to provide students and opportunity to work on projects that focus on conservation, wildlife biology and related fields of study, with rigorous standards. The 2017 DFP Fellowships will begin late May or early/mid June.

Travel costs for DFP participants to travel to the duty station of their assigned project and return to home/school are covered and the program includes a week of leadership training at the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, West Virginia before beginning the Fellowship.

As a DFP participant, the student will have an opportunity to apply classroom theories, principles and concepts to real-world situations, network, and develop relationships with USFWS Project Managers and other staff.

Upon successful completion of the DFP Fellowship and current degree requirements, the Fellow may have the opportunity to be appointed into a permanent position with USFWS.  They must successfully complete their Fellowship and meet the eligibility requirements and education and/or experience qualifications for a permanent position.

The Coastal Program is one of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s premier conservation delivery tools for voluntary, citizen and community-based fish and wildlife habitat restoration activities across the matrix of public and privately owned land. The program is known for creative approaches to getting meaningful conservation and recovery actions on-the-ground using a full suite of technical and partnership skills. Our office is located just outside of Maine’s largest city with easy access to mountains, rivers and beaches.

The deadline to apply to this opportunity is February 10th, 2017.

The announcement and application information (https://www.fws.gov/workforwildlife/dfp.html). The project number is DFP-17-R5-ECO-08.





The Arnold Arboretum offers paid internships in collections management with concentrations in horticulture and landscape maintenance, arboriculture, plant production, or collections curation. Experiences combine hands-on training, educational classes, and visits to other botanical institutions. Interns are accepted for 12- to 14-week appointments (typically May through August) with the exception of a limited number of longer-term (18- to 24-week) appointments based on available funding.

Deadline to submit an application is Feb 10, 2017.




Overview
The Environmental Voter Project is looking for highly-motivated undergraduates to join our selective Winter/Spring Internship Program. Interns will work closely with the Field Director and the CEO to learn about subjects such as field campaigning, nonprofit communications and data analytics. Interns will be expected to devote time to field outreach, senior staff support, event planning, research, and drafting of membership communications, blog posts, and stakeholder presentations. In addition to gaining valuable nonprofit advocacy skills, interns will become talented organizers and political operatives by learning the nuts and bolts of nonprofit work and electoral campaigning from an exciting and innovative organization.  We are seeking responsible, motivated candidates who can commit to 12+ hours per week for this program. This is an unpaid internship in Boston, MA.  
Main Job Responsibilities
  • Recruit and cultivate volunteers
  • Manage and participate in voter registration and canvassing
  • Track field operations and enter information into databases and dashboards
  • Participate in community events
  • Research and draft memos
  • Draft membership emails, stakeholder memos, and blog posts
  • Attend professional seminars
  • Research public relations opportunities
  • Outreach to college and university groups
  • Support Senior Staff in preparing for important events
Requirements
  • Candidates must submit a resume and cover letter
  • An interest in environmental issues or politics
  • An outgoing and friendly demeanor
  • Strong attention to detail
  • Ability to represent the Environmental Voter Project in a professional manner at all times
Time Commitment
  • Hours (weekly): 12+ hours per week.
  • During Business Hours?: Yes
  • Nights and Weekends?: Occasionally
  • Start Dates: January
  • Minimum Time Commitment: 12 weeks
Training Provided.
Interns will receive significant training in all aspects of field work, organizing, voter outreach, issues research, and membership communications.
Please email a resume and cover letter to Peter Polga-Hecimovich at peter@environmentalvoter.org.


Practice Makes Perfect (PMP), a NYC-based organization that partners with schools to provide academic summer programming for students in high-need communities is seeking highly motivated sophomore, junior, and senior undergraduates and graduate students to serve as their Teaching Fellows.

PMP’s intensive five-week program uses an innovative near-peer mentorship model that pairs students in grades K-8 with high-achieving role models from the same community. Our competitive fellowship places students with an interest in education and a passion for narrowing the achievement gap in front of these classrooms in the schools that need them the most.  Teaching Fellows will undergo comprehensive training that prepares them for the rewarding responsibility of leading a classroom and will receive one-on-one support from a NYC-certified teacher throughout the summer.  Teaching Fellows are instrumental in combating the summer learning loss and narrowing the achievement gap in NYC.  This is a full-time, paid position.  

If you know students who are interested in pursuing teaching and making a difference this summer, please pass along the attached job description and flyer.  For more information and to apply, students can visit practicemakesperfect.org/summer or email Emily Becker (fellowships@practicemakesperfect.org).

They will be attending the Boston College Career and Internship Fair on Wednesday, January 25th. Emily Becker will also be hosting an Information Session on Thursday, January 26th from 5:00pm-6:00pm in Fulton 310. This is a great opportunity for students to learn more about the Fellowship in.




The Earth Leadership Cohort
&
the Work That Reconnects

The Work That Reconnects is known worldwide for empowering activists in social and ecological justice. Developed by Joanna Macy and her colleagues, this dynamic, interactive body of work has inspired many thousands of people to engage wholeheartedly in a transition, a Great Turning as Joanna calls it, to a life-sustaining society. Described in the book, Coming Ba ck to Life, it brings a new way of seeing the world, as our larger living body, freeing us from the assumptions and attitudes that now threaten all life on Earth.

The Earth Leadership Cohort program (ELC) is designed to introduce young adults to the theory and practice of the Work That Reconnects (WTR) through an experiential immersion and then to offer opportunities to practice facilitating the work in the context of a supportive learning community. The first Earth Leadership Cohort of young adults convened in 2014, and a second and third cohort followed in 2015, and 2016. We are delighted to now be gathering a fourth  Earth Leadership Cohort for the spring of 2017.

The first meeting of the cohort will include a five-day workshop June 2-7 at Hallelujah Farm in Chesterfield, NH with a larger group of activists, educators, and artists. This intergenerational community of participants will be guided through the spiral of the Work That Reconnects, opening to the planetary realities of great suffering and rapid destruction as well as to the magnificence of the web of life. The work is personal as well as interactive, inviting fresh insight into our role in the Great Turning and new possibilities for collaboration.

The second meeting is a retreat June 22 25 just for the Cohort at Starseed Healing Sanctuary in Savoy, MA. There, the group has the opportunity to reflect on the rich experiences of the previous workshop, to facilitate the WTR group practices, and to begin to integrate new perspectives into their personal and professional dreams. The retreat is also a time for gathering resources, ideas, and support for going forth into the world as change agents, healers, compassionate listeners, and empowered citizens. As a community, the members decide how they would like to keep in touch and support one another in realizing their short-term goals and long-term visions. Alumni from the first three cohorts have organized several reunions and co-facilitated a number of Work That Reconnects workshops for the public. They have also formed an Earth Leadership Community and welcome future ELC alumni to join.




EnergySage is the only independent comparison-shopping website for solar energy systems and financing options in the country. Our fast-growing online marketplace matches thousands of homeowners per month with a rapidly growing list of 250+ pre-screened solar installers. The marketplace has been live since February ‘13 and has already processed tens of millions of dollars in transaction volume. Industry experts have reviewed that our “marketplace's functionality and usability is light years ahead of other similar sites”.
EnergySage is seeking a college senior, recent graduate, or graduate student with familiarity in energy and sustainability to help develop 10-15 articles for new content on the EnergySage website. This is a contract/freelance position and will be paid per article completion.
Location: Boston, MA or remote worker
Duration: Part-time, project-based
Compensation: Commensurate with the experience and education of the candidate
How to Apply: Send your resume and two writing samples (500-1500 words each) to Sara at: sara@energysage.com

Key Responsibilities

  • Research energy efficiency measures that homes and businesses can take to reduce their electricity costs
  • Develop helpful, consumer-friendly articles that explain every stage of the energy efficiency process for homes
  • Identify helpful, impartial academic and government resources that support all articles

Required Skills & Experience

  • Familiarity with energy efficiency, sustainability, and/or renewable energy
  • Experience researching and developing educational content
  • Excellent written communication skills
  • Experience writing for web and/or a consumer audience preferred
  • A self-starter with a strong drive to achieve

About EnergySage, Inc.

EnergySage is the "Kayak.com of Solar", the industry's first and only online marketplace for turnkey solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The EnergySage Marketplace transforms the complex Solar Photovoltaic (PV) shopping process into a simple online comparison-shopping experience that enables consumers to compare quotes from multiple pre-screened installers in an apples-to-apples format across all financing options. The unique, innovative platform provides unprecedented levels of choice, transparency, and information at no cost to consumers.
EnergySage’s benefits extend to providers such as manufacturers, installers, financiers and other professionals involved in the solar PV sales process as well, through increased consumer awareness, knowledge and demand for their services. By creating efficiencies in the buying and selling processes, EnergySage slashes the time and effort required by consumers and installers, significantly reducing customer acquisition costs, boosting consumer confidence, and ultimately accelerating mass-market solar adoption. EnergySage has been awarded two prestigious SunShot Awards by the U.S. Department of Energy. www.energysage.com
EnergySage is an affirmative action-equal opportunity employer.




Environmental League of Massachusetts, Communications/ Development Intern
Development and Communication Interns play a key role assisting with fundraising, communications, events, general administration, and special projects at ELM. The position offers an opportunity to develop and hone professional skills, gain exposure to best practices in fundraising and communications at an advocacy organization, and help strengthen the reach and effectiveness of the environmental community in Massachusetts.
If interested send resume and cover letter to Anne Meyer (BC, 2014) at ameyer@environmentalleague.org.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Summer 2017 Shark and Ray Research in Clearwater, FL

Program description:
This program is focused on a hands-on, field curriculum.  We conduct a 1 - 2 hr. lecture or class discussion each day and spend the rest of the day for 6 - 8 hours in the field conducting research on sharks and rays.  Most lectures are focused on elasmobranch biology, physiology, ecology, identification, and conservation.  Other lectures will include biology, physiology, identification, and conservation of sea turtles and manatees; fisheries, aquaculture, and ecotoxicology; the concept of a species; aquarium controversy; and how to develop a research project and communicate the results effectively.  To make this program as hands-on as possible, our students conduct all research activities under the supervision of one or more staff members or instructors.  This means that our students set and retrieve gear, handle any captured animals, collect data from any captured animals, tag elasmobranchs, and release all captured animals.  No previous research experience or animal handling experience is necessary.  This program is excellent for any student interested in the natural sciences, any student wanting to gain research experience, and any student interested in attending graduate school.

Program dates:  Our summer program runs at 1 week intervals (Sunday - Saturday) from May 7, 2017 - August 26, 2017.  Students may attend as many weeks as they would like.  Any student who attends 4 weeks or more will be acknowledged in any scientific paper published from the data collected that summer.  There are tuition breaks for students who attend 3 or more weeks as well as for groups of 6 or more students attending together.

Deadline for early enrollment benefits: December 31, 2016

Deadline for program enrollment: March 30, 2017

For pricing and program availability please visit the summer program page as well as the tuition page of our website http://www.coastalmera.com/summer-program.html


If you have any questions regarding the above courses and programs please contact us at info@coastalmera.com or (843)246-0750.




Overview
The Environmental Voter Project is looking for highly-motivated undergraduates to join our selective Fall Internship Program. Interns will work closely with the Field Director and the CEO to learn about subjects such as field campaigning, nonprofit communications and data analytics. Interns will be expected to devote time to field outreach, senior staff support, event planning, research, and drafting of membership communications, blog posts, and stakeholder presentations. In addition to gaining valuable nonprofit advocacy skills, interns will become talented organizers and political operatives by learning the nuts and bolts of nonprofit work and electoral campaigning from an exciting and innovative organization.  We are seeking responsible, motivated candidates who can commit to 12+ hours per week for this program. This is an unpaid internship in Boston, MA.  
Main Job Responsibilities
  • Recruit and cultivate volunteers
  • Manage and participate in voter registration and canvassing
  • Track field operations and enter information into databases and dashboards
  • Participate in community events
  • Research and draft memos
  • Draft membership emails, stakeholder memos, and blog posts
  • Attend professional seminars
  • Research public relations opportunities
  • Outreach to college and university groups
  • Support Senior Staff in preparing for important events
Requirements
  • Candidates must submit a resume and cover letter
  • An interest in environmental issues or politics
  • An outgoing and friendly demeanor
  • Strong attention to detail
  • Ability to represent the Environmental Voter Project in a professional manner at all times
Time Commitment
  • Hours (weekly): 12+ hours per week.
  • During Business Hours?: Yes
  • Nights and Weekends?: Occasionally
  • Start Dates: Early September
  • Minimum Time Commitment: 12 weeks
Training Provided.
Interns will receive significant training in all aspects of field work, organizing, voter outreach, issues research, and membership communications.
Please email a resume and cover letter to Peter Polga-Hecimovich at peter@environmentalvoter.org.




Looking for a job that makes a difference? U.S.PIRG is hiring college seniors to work as Campus Organizers on college campuses across the country. On issue after issue, we see powerful interests corrupting the democratic process, twisting public policy to serve their own ends. U.S. PIRG takes action by documenting the problems, finding practical solutions, informing the public and making the case for change directly to decision-makers. We work on fighting climate change, restoring democracy, and protecting public health. Apply online atwww.uspirg.org/jobs or email wellington@masspirgstudents.org for more details.

PIRG stands for the Public Interest Research Group. We take on issues where the public needs a champion—someone to stand up to powerful interests when they push the other way. We know that smart policy solutions and real change won’t just happen. You need to organize, advocate and fight for them.

Fellows
Our fellows don’t just sit behind a desk. You’ll be out in the real world—recruiting new groups to join a coalition, speaking in a church basement or town hall to win a new endorsement, organizing a news event or rally, meeting with an editorial board, or doing whatever else it takes to urge our public officials to do the right thing. This is a two-year program, expressly designed to prepare future leaders within PIRG. We look for smarts, leadership experience, top-notch written and verbal skills, and an eagerness to learn. We value experience organizing, including building campus groups.

Digital Campaigners
Our digital campaigners help us design and win campaigns on some of the most important issues affecting the public today. This position is an exciting way to organize and motivate people online. Our online campaigns reach tens of thousands of people and spread the word about making change. This is a position for professionals who are ready to turn online skills into political action. We’re looking for people with sharp writing skills, savvy strategic ability, and a talent for using social media.

To learn more and apply, visit jobs.uspirg.org.

U.S. PIRG is an equal opportunity employer and will not discriminate against any employee or applicant on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, religion, age, sex, handicap, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity or veteran status.



What do interns with Environment America interns do?  You’ll help us educate and engage more students and citizens on the most critical environmental issues of our time. You’ll help us get our issues into the media, build coalitions, organize events and lobby decision-makers. Ultimately, you’ll help us build the kind of public support it takes to win.

Campaigns

We’re working to stop global warming: We took a big step forward last summer when President Obama directed his Environmental Protection Agency to develop standards that would cut carbon pollution from power plants, the nation’s largest contributors to global warming pollution. This historic step won’t be enough to fully solve the problem, but it’ll be an important start. But standing in the way, at every step, is one of the most powerful special interests in the world: the fossil fuel industry. That’s where we come in. We’re working to rally millions of American citizens, along with local elected officials and other powerful voices to back the President’s plan.

We’re making sure we don’t frack our future: Dirty and dangerous fracking could soon put some of America’s most spectacular places at risk. And we know that this especially destructive method of drilling for gas contaminates water and turns forests and rural landscapes into industrial zones – making nearby families sick and contributing significantly to global warming as well. Now, we’re working to offset the outsized influence of the oil and gas industry and keep our remarkable special places protected.

We’re working to protect our rivers, lakes and streams:  To protect our waterways from pollution and destruction we need to crack down on factory farm pollution, sewage and other threats. And we know it won’t be easy because of big opposition from the Farm Bureau, giant agribusiness and others. Now, we’re working to harness grassroots support for clean water and turn it into the political power we need to have a lasting direct impact on our waterways.

Becoming an Environment America intern
If you agree that it’s time to solve these big environmental problems, the best thing you can do to get involved is to apply to be an Environment America intern today.

We’re looking for students who care deeply about the environment and are ready to make a difference now.

As an intern:
  • You’ll learn how to analyze environmental problems, push for smart solutions, and build the public support it takes to win
  • You’ll work side-by-side with one of our organizers, learning the ropes.
  • And you'll attend briefings and trainings to learn even more about environmental issues and gain organizing skill
  • And if you’re thinking you might want to make a career out of solving big environmental problems like global warming – interning with Environment America is one of the best ways to get started. Not only will you get the training and experience you need, but we hire our most talented and committed interns to join our Fellowship Program when they graduate. 

We’re hiring interns in Boston and 29 states nationwide. Email Madeline Page, Environment America’s Global Warming Outreach Director at mpage@environmentamerica.org with questions or to apply!

--
B. Kevin Brown
Graduate Assistant, Environmental Studies
617-552-2477
Devlin 213

Spring 2017 Office Hours: Monday 11:00am-4:00pm, Tuesday 11:30am-1:30pm, Wednesday 11:00am-3:00pm, and Thursday 11:30am-2:30pm




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